Archives for posts with tag: Mark Twain

Ron Drawing

^ the author

The book’s conclusion “Sì! Dos grandes!!” in the local dialect translates: Yes! Both big!! The Spanish ‘huevos’ (eggs) is slang for ‘balls.’

The first reflection I have to make is, *nearly* all of the characters along on this trip who I have bashed, deserve some degree of rehabilitation. I’ll begin with ‘The Sisters’ and the fact of, whatever their flaws, they have been a consistent force for good in this world, particularly in regards to the original intent of the word ‘charity.’ These girls have, over the course of their lives, unselfishly, generously, devotedly, given of their time and energy to the underprivileged, disadvantaged and poverty stricken communities of this world, particularly in regards to the communities of both Indians; the Indians of India and the Indians of Native America, ongoing for decades. And this has been the hard work of hands on devotion, not some abstract ‘feels good’ self-congratulatory endeavor. When it comes to practical matters, feeding people, providing educational opportunities for youth, or caring for orphans, ‘The Sisters’ have been there, hands on the circumstance. I count them as among my most treasured friends, even if they never talk to me again, following this dubious literary effort; the ‘metadata’ of which I stand by. Life is paradox.

The ‘Tibetan’ was a fine, ethical and outstanding human being when I’d met him and he is a fine, ethical and outstanding human being to this day, and knows my door is ever wide open to provide him hospitality- to the end of my life. Our friendship has been very native; when years were to intervene between visits, it was as if we’d last seen each other yesterday … with warm regards.

In the initial chapters, when introducing Jasper, I made a factual mistake which Neil Oram, the English playwright and poet, was kind enough to correct in an email exchange; I’d misremembered Jasper’s mother’s acquaintance with a powerful woman. As an American, the context threw me off, and so I had incorrectly placed an Englishwoman, Jasper’s mother, in close association with a powerful, national female executive, on intimate terms with Maggie Thatcher. It was actually Indira Gandhi, a friendship no doubt stemming from Gandhi’s days at Oxford.

My impression was Socket is a good man with whom I had little communication in common or, perhaps better said, Socket’s English was such a strange mix of bizarre & colloquial expressions intertwined with counter-culture slang, whoever it had been educated him in English language should be summarily shot… unless, that is, it was the Bandit Sister had educated him; in which case her next life will be the punishment of a ramrod-straight, Victorian schoolmarm.

Old Babette was product of her time and circumstance (as we all are.) When it comes to the ‘true/false’ quiz, I lied about her (or perhaps inadvertently, maybe not) when I took the liberty of acquainting her with Imelda Marcos- on account of the facts of the corporation her personal fortune had been associated with. Need I say more? On the other hand, Old Babette being acquainted with ‘The Sisters’ more likely than not indicates she had been generous in regard to the sisters bonafide charitable work. In that case, in the larger picture of things, who am I to judge her character?

What was great about Sensible Sue was, she never made herself a pain in the ass to anyone.

Bummer John got precisely the ass-kicking he deserves; for paining everyone he was with, with his pained view of life & pained expressions.

The Montana dyke, actually a very fine person, would never admit to me she was along on this trip when I’d speak to her about it; always insisting she “was on a different trip.” Now that may have been a deliberate allusion to the differing nature of our perceptions or, my psychosis of memory is playing with me because she had been so adamant on this point, I cannot anymore be certain whether she was actually along or not. If she wished to be a psychotic ‘manifestation’ of my memory, so be it.

If anyone is missing, it must be my psyche has blacked them out.

Nine years ago, when I’d published ‘Penucquem Speaks’ and was getting a few reviews, the second review kind of pissed me off… as it compared me to another writer; that is, Hunter S. Thompson. But then, this caused me to read Thompson’s ‘Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas’ and I had a good laugh. But quite honestly, it is Mark Twain’s style had impressed and influenced me, years previous to this. I doubt there is a greater biographical work of humor in American literature than Twain’s ‘Life on the Mississippi.’ Of course I am not either writer and what I do is entirely the fault of myself.

Kids! Don’t try this at home!!

*

My Madcap Adventure Table of Contents

Letter to the De Sousa clan of India

Ron Drawing

Economic theory by Ronald

*

Economics and Moonshine Whiskey

The fallacy of banks and nations buying and trading national debt was anticipated by Mark Twain well over a century ago:

In Twain’s story (from Huckleberry Finn) two half-wit drunks hatched a plan to make money from a jug of moonshine whisky. The plan was to sell the whiskey by the single shot.

These enterprising capitalists had a half-dollar between them. As the day went along and passed into the night, the single half-dollar passed again and again from one drunk’s pocket to the other’s pocket, as they’d bought whiskey shots from each other until their moonshine was exhausted. Badly inebriated, when the time came to tally their earnings from whiskey sales, there was a single half-dollar proceeds in total, and each became convinced the other had robbed him.

This is precisely the principle behind trading debt. The attending bubble created is the misapprehension of reality identical to the Twain drunken characters’ belief they should have seen a profit, but the value of the half-dollar never grows in reality. It’s like economic fracking, as many BTU’s of energy are put into developing the energy source as you can pull out out of the ground, in a race to stay ahead of the curve. The only thing that really happens is, the whiskey jug (taxpayer resources servicing the debt’s interest) is emptied and there will be a hangover and severe resulting illness; at some point a fatal case of cirrhosis.

Screen Shot 2015-01-26 at 10.40.43 AM

http://rt.com/shows/keiser-report/episode-490-max-keiser-104/

21 December 2016 update:

“The two new reports find that US forecasts of [shale] oil and gas abundance are over-hyped, unrealistic, and ignore mounting evidence of an industry in decline”

 *

The Satires

*

%d bloggers like this: